Saturday, 19 September 2015
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Great white shark (Carcharodon carcharias)

Great white sharks are at the very top of the marine food chain. Feared as man-eaters, they are only responsible for about 5-10 attacks a year, which are rarely fatal. Great whites are ultimate predators. Powerful streamlined bodies and a mouth full of terrifyingly sharp, serrated teeth, combine with super senses that can detect a single drop of blood from over a mile away. Hiding from a great white isn't an option as they can detect and home in on small electrical discharges from hearts and gills. Unlike most other sharks, live young are born that immediately swim away.

The great white shark, Carcharodon carcharias, also known as the great white, white pointer, white shark, or white death, is a species of large lamniform shark which can be found in the coastal surface waters of all the major oceans. The great white shark is mainly known for its size, with the largest individuals known to have approached or exceeded 6.1 m (20 ft) in length, and 2,268 kg (5,000 lb) in weight. This shark reaches its maturity around 15 years of age and can have a life span of over 30 years.

The great white shark is arguably the world's largest known extant macropredatory fish, and is one of the primary predators of marine mammals. It is also known to prey upon a variety of other marine animals, including fish and seabirds. It is the only known surviving species of its genus Carcharodon, and is ranked first in having the most attacks on humans. The IUCN list the great white shark as a vulnerable species, while it is included in Appendix II of CITES. The bestselling novel Jaws by Peter Benchley and the subsequent blockbuster film by Steven Spielberg depicted the great white shark as a "ferocious man eater". In reality, humans are not the preferred prey of the great white shark.



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